We are all earthlings

Hey!

Another funny but also insightful story from Samaipata:

During our time there we met an interesting person from Germany. She was a transgender that has been living in Bolivia for a year and a bit now. She didn’t really have an easy time there. Learning Spanish is not her strength I guess, and immigration’s have been harder than expected. But proud she told us that the energy from El Fuerte would help her out and that’s why she stayed here. Probably also because there are so many travelers all the time. :-)

One thing that she said made me think about a specific topic from a completely different side: I have always had this opinion that being respectful and understandable is a necessity when going to another country, especially when the country was poorer than mine. That it was crucial to adjust to what the locals expect from you. Indeed, this makes all travels easier in any case.

What this woman said however, is in some way also true. Read More »

Sharing a ride with a 40-something truck driver

When we made our way to Cuevas we stopped a truck by the street that would take us with him to the nature reserve a few kilometers down the road. (Yep, it is like hitchhiking, but they will usually expect some money!) He was really interested in us and asked questions about where we were from, how much money we need for our travels, how much things cost in Europe, what the weather was like, and so on.

He also told us a lot about himself – he drove a truck from Potosí to Santa Cruz and back. It would take him a few days. His wife was back home in Potosí and had a small kiosk, she had to take care of. He said it was not possible for them to live off just of his salary, so she had to find something to do for her. He said people in Bolivia wouldn’t earn a lot of money, only those that went to school and would now sit in an office.Read More »

How to: Build a house 101

In Samaipata we were able to help out a Spanish family. I already talked about them before. They had two small but beautiful houses, one they lived in and the other one they were renting out. But their plans are much bigger. They want to build another, bigger house where they wanted to move into and then live off the rent of the other two and eventually from that money travel a little bit in South America. So we were happy to help. At the moment they are working on a small garden hut for their tools and to provide their volunteers a sleeping space upstairs. We helped to render that from the inside and out.Read More »

Amboró National Park

Amboró National Park is a huge park that stretches in the middle of Bolivia. To enter it is required to always have a certified guide with you and that can get quite expensive. We were really lucky to go with the friends of our hosts who gathered a group to go on a Saturday. Amboró is very close to Samaipata and it is famous for its diversity because again it is a mix of jungle, mountain ranges and lowland. All these landscapes meet there which grants you amazing views!Read More »

One day in the biggest city of Bolivia

Most people might have not even heard of this place before, at least I haven’t before even entering Bolivia – Santa Cruz de la Sierra. It is with over 1.5 million people the biggest city of Bolivia and located in the East right before entering the jungle on either side but the West. The name means Holy Cross of the Mountains which doesn’t really make sense to me because it’s more a selva-place (jungle). It is a surprisingly modern city, clearly influenced by nearby Argentina and Brazil, and also serves as industrial hot spot of Bolivia. We haven’t really thought about visiting it but as we arrived with the night bus at 7 am it gave us plenty of time to stroll around in the center and just enjoy a relaxing Sunday there before continuing our trip.Read More »

Long-distance bus disasters

Long-distance buses are essential for traveling South America. They’ll take you anywhere! It will take you a few hours, sometimes more, sometimes less, but you will get there eventually. Since we landed in Lima in the middle of January those buses were the only way we made it from A to B, not always comfortable but reasonably priced and (almost) always there when you need them. When you look at the continent of South America it might seem small because countries are so big and spread out. To take you from Lima to Cusco for example will take you around 22 hours and that being on a good road. So we’ve gotten pretty used to spending good amounts of time on buses and even came to like it. Everything that is under 6 hours actually seems to be a short time of traveling. Darn, that will be a big change coming back to Europe and realizing that everything is so close!Read More »

Die Hoffnung noch nicht aufgegeben

Im letzten Post habe ich erwähnt, dass wir uns ein bisschen außerhalb der „Touri-Gegend“ aufgehalten haben und eine grandiose Landschaft erleben durften, und dass es einem manchmal die Lebenseinstellung völlig auf den Kopf stellt, wenn man sich aus seinem Alltag raustraut. Hier ein weiteres Beispiel, das sogar mit diesem Tag zusammenhängt.

Eine kleine Vorgeschichte:Read More »

Habits to break

Hey people!

Like you can read in the title this tiny post will be about a few habits I formed during my travels in South America – and that I will need to break as soon as I land on European soil again. Not that I am thinking about coming home yet, in fact we are just at our half point of our travels and I feel this time passed way too fast, even though we saw and learned so many things already. Whatever – I will get right to it now! :-)Read More »

Happy birthday to myself

Just throwing in a little life-update from my side here:

As I recently celebrated my 21st birthday (finally considered a complete adult – even in the US!) I decided to spoil myself a little bit. As some of you might know, the last few months I have been maintaining this blog solely from my iPhone, one with only 8GB storage! :D You can probably tell how frustrating this whole task can become considering I had to play the pictures from the camera to my phone and “edit” them and type everything with my two thumbs. Not complaining – I still loved to prepare every single post. It just took me close to forever.

Read More »