5 Ways to Get to Machu Picchu: Useful Information Before Making Your Trip to the Ancient Inca Ruins

Hello there! :-)

I’m back with a little informational post about one of the most famous and most visited sites in South America, if not the most famous – MACHU PICCHU!

I still remember myself sitting in front of the laptop getting ready for Peru, trying to find some insiders or, you know, information so we would be able to make the most out of our stay in South America. It wasn’t that easy – different sites said different things and especially when it came to Machu Picchu things got super complicated as you need a ticket, a train, a guide, bla bla bla. I didn’t really understand what was going on and what to believe.

But now that I’ve been through all this mess myself I hope that I can help out some fellow traveler that is just as overwhelmed with all the information out there as I was just about a year ago. Read More »

Rainbow Mountain – Surreal Landscapes On 5.200 m

Last year I was scrolling through my Instagram when I suddenly stumbled upon a picture that showed a scenery that I couldn’t quite believe existed for real – a mountain range covered with colored stripes that I thought were artificial. My boyfriend and I had just booked our flights to South America and were planning out our itinerary to Peru, so this little information came in quite handy. Of course I am talking about the “Rainbow Mountain” in the Ausangate Valley just around the corner from Cusco which was then on our “South America To-Do”-List ever since.Read More »

Dia del Trabajo, Cusco

CUSCO – On The Trails of The Incas

Cusco – probably the best-known place during our travels thus also the most visited by people from all over the world. If you haven’t heard of Cusco I’ll only say Machu Picchu and it will ring a bell for most of you. Cusco was the capital of the Inca Empire about 500 years ago and therefore you can nowadays still find a lot of evidence of their existence around the city. Ruins are spread in all directions making up one tourist attraction after another demonstrating the skills and knowledge the Incas must have had in their best times to construct such buildings and temples. However, the empire wasn’t meant to last for very long. When the Incas expanded up to Quito, the possible new leader of the Incas was born there. This resulted in internal fights between the Incas based around Cusco and the ones around Quito. Weakened by this “civil war” the Incas then weren’t able to defend their land against the Spaniards that arrived in the 16th century. After the Spanish invasion Cusco had a lot of churches to offer, too, which now characterize the center of the city.Read More »

Isla Amantani

Did You Know There Were People Living on Floating Islands? – Island Hopping on Lake Titicaca

What a week! Completely stunned by the beauty of Isla del Sol, we made our way up north back to Peru and the other half of the biggest high altitude lake – Titicaca.

Our base camp was again Puno where we stayed at the hostel Ollanta Inn. The owner is a really kind man that knows a lot about the history of the country and he also gave us some recommendations about what to do with the remainder of our time in Peru.

For Titicaca we definitely wanted to see the populated islands not too far away from the shore. So one brisk morning we joined a tour that took us out to the first stop: The Floating Islands of Uros. Read More »

Rainforest: Trekking and Relaxing on Our Short Getaway to Coroico, Bolivia

Hello! :-)

What started with an incidentally mentioned recommendation from a fellow traveler turned out to be one of our highlights of our trip: Coroico. Located North of La Paz it is a convenient tourist destination offering plenty of hikes around the region. We went straight to the little town after our Death Road adventure, because that tour ended close by. I read a little bit about it before and expected loads of people in Coroico and even though we were there over the weekend it was quite calm. Coroico lies on a very steep hill, so walking around the village either with your big backpacks or groceries can shamelessly be counted in as a workout. The benefit of the steepness however is that almost every point in the village can be used as a viewpoint to see the valleys full of “junglely” vegetation that spread around.Read More »

Riding a Bike on the World’s Most Dangerous Road

The World’s Most Dangerous Road? That sounds quite badass!

Actually, I can calm you down. I didn’t do anything life-endangering or absolutely crazy. ;-)

Until a few years ago this road was the World’s Most Dangerous Road. It connected La Paz with the jungle. So all cars, buses and even trucks had to take it. Being extremely narrow it claimed many, many lives. Thankfully, now it is only used as a tourist biking attraction while all other vehicles can go down by the newly paved road. Clearly for bikers it is not that hard to stay on the path, and our guide told us that if bikers get injured it is because they ride like maniacs, fall down on the unpaved road and break their arms. Still I treated the route with a lot of respect, also knowing that up to 300 people died there yearly.Read More »

Soaking up the energy of El Fuerte

Hello there!

Remember when I told you about the energetic place that attracted loads of expats to stay in the village of Samaipata? Of course we couldn’t skip these ruins. So a sunny and really hot Sunday morning we made our way to the historic place. It is a 10 km walk or taxi ride from the center of the village. As we had plenty of time on us we walked there, rewarded by the amazing views along the way.Read More »

Are you a tourist or a traveler?

You probably don’t even have to get out of your home town to meet most of the different kinds of travelers. There are selfie-tourists, the extremely culture-savvy tourists, the “hippies”, the luxury travelers, the nature adventurers. And a lot more. Especially Peru being a big destination for all kinds of people – rich and not so rich – we met a whole bunch of different people, some only spending a week escaping from their busy routines at home and others who are in their third (!) year of traveling the Americas. I think getting to know every single person inspired me and boyfriend so much and meeting new people, like-minded or not, is one of the best parts of traveling.

After all I noticed some conflicts or rather differences of opinion between the groups of travelers. Somehow, each group is looking down on the others in some form.Read More »